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Rosemary (Salvia rosmarinus)

Rosemary (Salvia rosmarinus)

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

About

Rosemary is an herb. Oil is extracted from the leaf and used to make medicine.

Rosemary is used for digestion problems, including heartburn, intestinal gas (flatulence), and loss of appetite. It is also used for liver and gallbladder complaints, gout, cough, headache, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, reducing age-related memory loss, improving energy and mental tiredness, opiate withdrawal symptoms, sunburn protection, and diabetic kidney disease.

Some women use rosemary for increasing menstrual flow and causing abortions.

Rosemary is applied to the skin for preventing and treating baldness It is also used for treating circulation problems, toothache, a skin condition called eczema, muscle pain, pain along the sciatic nerve, and chest wall pain. It is also used for wound healing, in bath therapy (balneotherapy), and as an insect repellent.

In foods, rosemary is used as a spice. The leaf and oil are used in foods, and the oil is used in beverages.

In manufacturing, rosemary oil is used as a fragrant component in soaps and perfumes.

Traditionally used for

Age-related mental decline.
Patchy hair loss.
Male-pattern baldness.
Arthritis pain.
Mental performance.
Diabetic kidney damage.
Mental tiredness.
Fibromyalgia.
Hypotension.
Opiate withdrawal.
Sunburn.
Cough.
Eczema.
Gas (flatulence).
Gout.
Headache.
High blood pressure.
Increasing menstrual flow.
Indigestion.
Liver and gallbladder problems.
Toothache.

Dosage

The appropriate dose of rosemary depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for rosemary. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Possible Side Effects

Rosemary is SAFE when consumed in amounts found in foods. Rosemary is SAFE for most people when taken by mouth, applied to the skin, or inhaled as aromatherapy for medicinal purposes.

However, the undiluted oil is LIKELY UNSAFE to take by mouth. Taking large amounts of rosemary can cause vomiting, uterine bleeding, kidney irritation, increased sun sensitivity, skin redness, and allergic reactions.

Special Precautions & Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Rosemary is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts. Rosemary might stimulate menstruation or affect the uterus, causing a miscarriage. Not enough is known about the safety of applying rosemary to the skin during pregnancy. If you are pregnant, it's best to avoid rosemary in amounts larger than food amounts.

If you are breast-feeding, also steer clear of rosemary in medicinal amounts. Not enough is known about what effects it might have on the nursing infant.

Aspirin allergy: Rosemary contains a chemical that is very similar to aspirin. This chemical, known a as salicylate, may cause a reaction in people who are allergic to aspirin.
Bleeding disorders: Rosemary might increase the risk of bleeding and bruising in people with bleeding disorders. Use cautiously.

Seizure disorders: Rosemary might make seizure disorders worse. Don't use it.

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