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Chia (Salvia hispanica)

Chia (Salvia hispanica)

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  

About

When you hear "chia," you may think of "Chia Pets." These are clay figures sold in the US that support the growth of chia sprouts. But chia has a much longer history as a medicinal herb. It originated in Mexico and was cultivated by the Aztecs. Today, chia is grown commercially in Central America and South America. It is grown mainly for its seed, which is a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids.

People use chia seed for diabetes, improving exercise performance, high blood pressure, reducing the risk of heart disease, reducing a group of conditions that increase the risk of heart disease, and weight loss.).

Chia is applied to the skin for itchy skin (pruritus).

How does it work?

Chia seeds contain a large amount of healthy omega-3 fatty acids and dietary fiber. Researchers think omega-3 fatty acids and fiber help reduce risk factors for heart disease.

Traditionally used for

Diabetes.
Exercise performance.
High blood pressure.
A group of conditions that increase the risk of heart disease (metabolic syndrome).
Itching.

Dosage

The appropriate dose of chia depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for chia. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Possible Side Effects

Chia is SAFE Early research shows that applying lotion containing chia seed oil to the skin for 8 weeks reduces itching.

Special Precautions & Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of chia during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

High blood fats called triglycerides: Blood contains several types of fat, including cholesterol and triglycerides. Triglyceride levels are too high in some people. Eating some types of chia can make them even higher. If you have high triglycerides, stick with using a specific variety of chia called Salba. Salba does not significantly increase triglyceride levels.

Prostate cancer: Chia contains a lot of alpha-linolenic acid. Some research suggests that large amounts of alpha-linolenic acid in the diet might increase the chance of getting prostate cancer. If you have prostate cancer or have a high risk of getting it, avoid eating large amounts of chia.

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